Join us at Onizuka Space Science Day

Saturday, March 9, 2019

El Camino College

Meet a NASA Astronaut

Take part in Science Demonstrations

For reservations:

http://bit.ly/eccspaceday

For more info SpaceDay@elcamino.edu or call 310-660-3487

NASA Astronaut,  Stanley G. Love will be our keynote speaker and will conduct a question and answer session. Students will be involved with hands-on scientific workshops.

Click for Onizuka Day 2017 Brochure

 

Onizuka Space Science Day is dedicated to the memory of the seven Challenger astronauts, who on January 28, 1986 lost their lives in pursuit of their dreams. Their courage and ambition continues to inspire all.

Jan. 28 marked the 28th anniversary of the accident that took the lives of Ellison Onizuka and six crewmates. In Little Tokyo, the monument dedicated to the crew of the space shuttle Challenger attracted more attention than usual because of a large wreath placed next to it — an annual tradition. The model was built in 1990 by Isao Hirai, president of the Scale Model Company in Hawthorne. “ He basically obtained the specifications from North American, who built the shuttle,” Murakoshi said. “This model is to (one-tenth) scale, and the paint that you see is the exact paint that you would have seen on the Challenger …He noted that astronauts who have seen the model say it is “exactly like the Challenger was at that time.”

Murakoshi, who has been on the 13-member board since 1994, inspected the monument along with Vice President Ted Tashima and Treasurer Herb Omura, both of whom are original board members.

The original president, Matt Matsuoka, knew Onizuka and his family personally. He was invited to witness the launch of the Challenger but was unable to attend.

Like the Onizuka Memorial Committee on Hawaii’s Big Island, the Los Angeles group sponsors an annual Space Science Day for young people during spring break. It started at University of Southern California and was moved to El Camino College in 1999.

“Our primary intent for having Space Science Day is to follow Ellison Onizuka’s dream,” Murakoshi explained. “He wanted to give the message to the young kids that no matter how large your dream is, it’s always achievable. He wanted them to get very interested in science, technology, so we decided that we should have a conference where we can invite the kids.

“We have approximately 1,000 students attending at El Camino College, and we have various breakout sessions covering various technologies and science. We always have a guest astronaut from NASA in Houston. We also have astronauts from the Japanese space agency, JAXA. They … talk about Ellison, talk about the space program. Then we have a breakout session where the students in attendance can speak directly to the astronaut.”

Make your life count – and the world will be a better place because you tried.

– Ellison S. Onizuka, 1980

 Click for Onizuka Day 2017 Brochure

Our Speaker in 2019


International NASA Astronaut

Stanley G. Love

 

SPACEFLIGHT EXPERIENCE:  In 2008, Dr. Love completed his first spaceflight on the crew of STS-122, logging more than 306 hours in space, including more than 15 hours in two spacewalks.  STS-122 Atlantis (February 7 to February 20, 2008) was the 24th shuttle mission to visit the International Space Station.  The primary objective of the flight was to carry the European Space Agency’s Columbus Laboratory module to the space station and install it there permanently.  Dr. Love performed two spacewalks to help prepare the Columbus Laboratory for installation, to add two science payloads to the outside of Columbus and to carry a failed station gyroscope to the shuttle for return to Earth.  Dr. Love’s flight duties also included operation of both the station and shuttle robotic arms.  STS-122 was a crew replacement mission, delivering Expedition-16 Flight Engineer, European Space Agency Astronaut Léopold Eyharts, and returning home with Expedition-16 Flight Engineer, NASA Astronaut Daniel Tani.  The STS-122 mission was accomplished in 12 days, 18 hours, 21 minutes and 40 seconds and traveled 5,296,832 statute miles in 203 Earth orbits.

 

 

 
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